Hooking up and dating a comparison bogle

22-Mar-2020 06:17 by 5 Comments

Hooking up and dating a comparison bogle - updating old modular home with paneling

Description: It happens every weekend: In a haze of hormones and alcohol, groups of male and female college students meet at a frat party, a bar, or hanging out in a dorm room, and then hook up for an evening o...It happens every weekend: In a haze of hormones and alcohol, groups of male and female college students meet at a frat party, a bar, or hanging out in a dorm room, and then hook up for an evening of sex first, questions later.

In her new book, Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus (New York University Press, 2008), Bogle wields the tools of the sociologist, employing in-depth interviews with students and graduates from two unnamed universities -- one a large East Coast public university, the other a smaller Roman Catholic institution in the Northeast -- and placing the culture of hooking up in a historical context.

Recent studies on college students’ sexual and romantic relationships suggest that a sexual double standard continues to organize sexuality on many campuses.

Data from the Online College Social Life Survey shed light on students’ evaluation of casual sex, or “hooking up.” In addition to exploring gendered attitudinal patterns, we use gender structure theory to explore how individual characteristics and normative expectations of campus group affiliations shape attitudes.

As casually as the sexual encounter begins, so it often ends with no strings attached; after all, it was just a hook up.

While a hook up might mean anything from kissing to oral sex to going all the way, the lack of commitment is paramount.

Consuming sports media and watching reality television were the best media predictors of men's judgments about women's bodies.

Less variability was explained in women's preferences for men partners’ bodies, but endorsing adversarial sexual attitudes was positively related to judging the ideals chosen for men's bodies as important.

She answered questions via e-mail, shedding light on what she calls the "center of college social life."Q: Your book is a scholarly take on an issue with popular appeal. A: I wrote this book with several audiences in mind, including college administrators, parents and college students.

I hoped administrators and student life personnel would read it to figure out what is going on in the lives of their students and how the hookup culture is related to some of the major residence-life issues, such as alcohol use and sexual assault.

So, take a stroll down memory lane to remember all of our past Word of the Year selections.

= 160) were asked about their body type preferences for (hypothetical) romantic partners.

Listen to her NPR Interview The Sociology of "Hooking Up": Author Interview on Inside Higher Ed Newsweek: Campus Sexperts Hookup culture creates unfamiliar environment - to parents, at least Hooking Up: What Educators Need to Know - An op-ed on CHE by the author It happens every weekend: In a haze of hormones and alcohol, groups of male and female college students meet at a frat party, a bar, or hanging out in a dorm room, and then hook up for an evening of sex first, questions later.